Eastie Man Indicted on Child Sexual Assault, Child Pornography Charges

An East Boston man was indicted by Suffolk County District Attorney Rachel Rollin’s office last week for allegedly sexually assaulting one child, allegedly enticing another to create child pornography for him, and allegedly transmitting dozens of graphic sexual images of minors through a smartphone application.

A Suffolk County grand jury returned indictments last Tuesday charging Domenic D’Amore, 29, of East Boston with three counts of indecent assault and battery on a child under 14; four counts of trafficking in persons for sexual servitude; four counts of dissemination of matter harmful to a minor; three counts of posing a child in a state of nudity; eight counts of dissemination of child pornography; two counts of possession of child pornography; and two counts of possession with intent to distribute child pornography.

D’Amore was initially charged and arraigned in January in Chelsea District Court after Revere pawn shop workers found child pornography on a phone D’Amore had sold.

Yesterday’s indictments move the case to Suffolk Superior Court, where it will be adjudicated.

“These charges are disturbing and represent some of the worst crimes against children,” said District Attorney Rollins. “Survivors who have been exploited through child pornography may never be fully able to put these offenses in the past, because the images of their abuse live on. They bear the pain of knowing that individuals across the globe – and possibly even in their own community – are viewing photos and videos of the most painful and degrading moments of their lives.”

According to the District Attorney, back in December workers at a Revere pawn shop notified Revere Police that they found images depicting child pornography on a phone that D’Amore defendant sold at the business.

A forensic examination of that phone and a second phone belonging to D’Amore revealed hundreds of graphic images and videos of children being sexually abused or posed in a sexual manner. Prosecutors said that D’Amore had allegedly shared and allegedly received similar graphic images through the Kik app on multiple occasions, including a single day in November during which he allegedly shared at least 75 files containing child pornography.

Detectives also became aware that an email service provider filed two CyberTips with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children that each report separate instances of images identified as child pornography being uploaded to an email account.

Police determined that the email account belonged to D’Amore.

In messages sent on Kik, D’Amore allegedly made statements that he had sexually abused a young child. The child underwent a forensic interview at the Children’s Advocacy Center of Suffolk County and disclosed abuse allegedly by D’Amore.

D’Amore is also charged with trafficking in persons for sexual servitude for allegedly enticing a teenage victim to create child pornography. In a text exchange discovered on a second phone belonging to the defendant, he allegedly made statements offering to pay the victim in return for sexual images and acts and instructed the teen to pose nude in photos. In addition to receiving those photographs from the victim, the D’Amore is also accused of sending sexual images to the child.

“Allegations like these are incredibly difficult for many adults to fathom, but in order to protect the children in our lives, we have to talk about and acknowledge the potential risks that exist online,” said  Rollins. “It’s vital that parents and guardians have open discussions with their children about ways they can stay safe, both online and off. Above all, children need to know that they can talk to caring adults in their lives about anything that makes them feel uncomfortable or unsafe and that they won’t get in trouble for what they say. As the parent of a teenager, I know these conversations are difficult and awkward, but our children’s safety, physical, and mental health depend on it.”

Rollins said while the victims and witnesses of any crime should call 911 in an emergency, there are additional resources available to report suspected crimes against children. In Suffolk County, survivors of child abuse and exploitation and their non-offending caretakers can receive comprehensive services at the Children’s Advocacy Center of Suffolk County. The CAC can be reached at 617-779-2146. Anyone who believes that a child in Massachusetts may be the victim of abuse can call the Department of Children and Families’ Child at Risk Hotline at 1-800-792-5200. Those concerned that a child is being exploited online may report a Cybertip to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-THE-LOST or www.cybertipline.com. Finally, if parents want help navigating online risks and how to discuss them with children and teens, District Attorney Rollins offers the Stop Block and Talk internet safety training program for caregivers and professionals. Information on the program and helpful resources can be found at http://www.suffolkdistrictattorney.com/stop-block-and-talk.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.